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Cute, but for how long?


What would you say if over 20% of the art treasures in the National Gallery were to be taken to the dump and burned? What if over 20% of our national sporting fixtures were to be cancelled for all time? Well, that's what might happen to another part of Australia's national heritage - our unique marsupial fauna. Over 20% of these cute furries are threatened with extinction - gone for all time - if we don't do something about it.

Bilbies and numbats ahead in the NSW mallee.
Bilbies and numbats ahead in the NSW mallee.

EcoPix photographer Wayne Lawler has been on assignment in the outback for two conservation organisations.

One is rearing a suite of threatened marsupials for reintroduction into a large area of mallee which is to be fenced, and feral predators removed - the cats and foxes which have hastened the marsupials' decline. Meet some of these lovely native animals below.

Boodie or burrowing betong.
Boodie or burrowing bettong.  

Our beloved Easter bilby.
Our beloved Easter Bilby.

The ultra cute mala or rufous hair wallaby.
The ultra cute Mala or rufous hair wallaby.

Woylie or brush-tailed bettong.
Woylie or brush-tailed bettong.

The other conservation group is using donations to buy an enormous property where the Simpson Desert and the Channel Country meet in southwest Queensland.

A University of Sydney research team has been studying the mammal fauna of this area for ten years and it is known to be home to an important population of threatened desert marsupials. It's also grand country...

Spectacular edge of the Simpson Desert.
Escarpment on Ethabuka Station between the edge of the Simpson Desert and the Channel Country.  

The Ningaui, a pint-sized predator and terror of desert insects!
The Ningaui, a pint-sized predator and terror of desert insects!

Desert sandplain country on Ethabuka - habitat of endangered marsupials.
Desert sandplain country on Ethabuka - habitat of endangered marsupials.

Channel country wetlands on Ethabuka add to its biodiversity.
Channel country wetlands on Ethabuka add to its biodiversity.

Far from barren, it has quite dense woodlands and shrublands rich in wildlife.
Far from barren, it has quite dense woodlands and shrublands rich in wildlife.

Radio tracking an endangered marsupial.

If you are interested in helping rescue the boodies, bilbies, woylies, malas and more from extinction, visit the
Australian Wildlife Conservancy site.

Photographing Ethabuka.

If you are interested in buying a hectare or two of gorgeous desert country for the ningauis and their friends, visit the
Australian Bush Heritage Fund site.


Check out our previous Latest Pix news. You can order any of these pictures from: EcoPix.com.au
Note the picture code and the general subject matter.

ECOPIX Ecological Pictures, P.O. Box 67, Scarborough, Queensland, Australia, 4020.

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